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Farm biosecurity

Biosecurity is about managing animal and plant health, and the risks and impacts of animal and plant pests and diseases, weeds, pest animals, marine pests and contaminants.

This video provides information about key measures you can put in place to protect your property and Queensland.

Running time: 03:51 minutes

For more information about how you can develop and manage biosecurity measures on your property, visit www.farmbiosecurity.com.au

Video transcript

Biosecurity is about managing animal and plant health, and the risks and impacts of animal and plant pests and diseases, weeds, pest animals, marine pests and contaminants.

Queensland's large coastline, diverse landscape and climate, and our close proximity to South East Asia, together with increasing global trade and greater movement of people and products, increase our biosecurity risks. We need to keep watch, and report and manage these potential biosecurity risks to maintain our access to export markets and protect our economy, environment and way of life.

When new laws are introduced by the 1st of  July biosecurity will be everyone's responsibility. You will need to understand and manage your day-to-day biosecurity risks, and industry will play a more active role in management, reporting and response. Biosecurity Queensland will also have greater capacity to respond to and manage an emergency.

There are four key measures you can put in place to protect your property.

  1. Restrict visitors
    Visitors can unintentionally carry diseases, pests and weeds onto your property. This includes staff, suppliers, vets, agronomists, stock agents, contractors, family and friends. Bacteria, pests and weed seeds are often invisible to the human eye, and can be easily transferred onto skin, clothing and machinery. Controlling access to your property allows you to record all movement of people, livestock and plants. Make sure that everyone who comes to your property understands and implements your biosecurity measures.
  2. Keep it clean
    Good hygiene on your property is important. Make sure everyone washes their hands and shoes, and wears clean clothing. Think about setting up a designated cleaning area for visitors and their vehicles and equipment. Frequently clean and disinfect all tools and equipment, and don't share them.
  3. Know what's coming and going
    Keep accurate records of where your livestock or plants come from and go to, and use registered suppliers. In the event of a new disease or pest, these records will help to trace the source. When you receive new livestock or plants, isolate them from other production areas and regularly check for pests or unusual symptoms. When you receive new livestock or plants, isolate them from other production areas and regularly check for pests or unusual symptoms. But your responsibility doesn't end at your front gate. If your livestock or plants are showing signs of pests or diseases, don't let them leave your property.
  4. Be careful with chemicals
    Chemicals can pose risks if not used, stored or disposed of correctly. Vaccines, antibiotics, pesticides and other chemical products used on livestock and plants must be applied with caution, and in accordance with government and industry standards. Make sure you obtain the appropriate training and advice before you use chemicals on your property.

Biosecurity is everyone's responsibility. Report any unusual signs or symptoms immediately—call Biosecurity Queensland on 13 25 23. Protect your property and you will protect Queensland.