Amberjack

  • Amberjack (Seriola dumerili)
    Amberjack (Seriola dumerili)
Scientific name

Seriola dumerili

Other names
  • common amberjack
  • greater amberjack
  • kingfish
Frequent misidentifications
  • samsonfish
  • high-fin amberjack
Description
  • bluish-grey or olive on back: often an amber stripe from eye along middle of body
  • sides and belly silvery white, sometimes brownish or with a pinkish tinge
  • usually a darker bar through eye to dorsal fin origin
  • caudal (tail) fin dark or dusky extreme tip of lower caudal fin lobe sometimes light or white
  • teeth appear white; lumps surrounding broad bands of teeth in both jaws not engorged with blood
Distribution
  • reefs, deep offshore holes or drop-offs (a species that is both bottom dwelling and pelagic)
  • along the length of the Queensland coast and out to the Great Barrier Reef
Size
  • 100 cm common fork length (at a maximum weight of approximately 15 kg)
  • 188 cm maximum total length (at a maximum weight of approximately 80.6 kg)
  • verified angling record: 150 cm fork length, 67.6 kg
Size and possession limits
  • minimum size limit: 50 cm
  • possession limit: combined possession limit of two for amberjack and samsonfish
  • this species, along with giant queenfish, highfin amberjack, samsonfish, swallow-tailed dart and yellowtail kingfish are excluded from the combined possession limit of 20 which generally applies to members of the Carangidae family (including but not limited to trevallies, queenfishes, scads, darts and kingfishes)
How to distinguish from high-fin amberjack
  • dorsal fin length about equal to, or slightly longer than, pectoral fin
How to distinguish from samson fish
  • dorsal fin has 29 to 35 soft rays
  • teeth appear white; lumps surrounding broad bands of teeth in both jaws not engorged with blood

Further information

Last updated 04 April 2017